Monday, April 13, 2015

6 Things that are Never Bad Ideas When it Comes to Speaking Events

A Cell  Phone Number
You can never tell what could go wrong at the last minute. In your speaker's agreement, its never a bad idea to ask for a cell phone number on the day of the event in case you're running late or you become lost. Providing your cell phone number for them will also allow the client to contact you if anything changes late in the game.

Parking / Building Entry Directions
I once got hired to speak at an employee meeting that was held inside of a convention center on a Sunday. The convention center was as big as a city and every door was locked and all parking lots were empty. I finally found the group in an out building that wasn't easy to find. It's never a bad idea to ask for any special instructions to eliminate just such a situation.

A Back Up LCD Projector
If your talk relies on your power point presentation and you own an LCD projector, it's never a bad idea to bring yours along if you are driving to the event. A hotel can usually produce a replacement but a smaller private client may not. At the very least, always be prepared to conduct your presentation without the power point. Print off copies of your slides to have as a backup plan.

Show Up Early to Scope it Out
Good speakers get to the location of the event in advance and stand at the front of the room before hand, to get a feel for the room. I once showed up early to an event and discovered the room wasn't going to work well for me. With my client's permission, I rearranged the room to enhance the audience's experience for the better. Doing that is never a bad idea.

Letter of Recommendation
One of the best ways of securing more speaking gigs is to have written recommendations from past clients, to share with prospective clients. Include a request for this letter in your speaker's agreement and then follow up with an email, after you've completed your presentation. If your client is an active Linkedin user, it's never a bad idea to send them a recommendation request.

Learn from Others' Experiences
It is never a bad idea to hear about the experiences other speakers have had. You'll learn what or what not to do to minimize their nightmares from becoming yours. I recently compiled 40 of the most harrowing stories from professional speakers on what can go wrong. Download the eBook by CLICKING HERE. It's just 99 cents.

Bill Corbett is a professional speaker who has been influencing audiences for over 20 years. He is the author of several books, including HOW TO BECOME A CONFERENCE SPEAKER. Bill has been selected to deliver the keynote at a large conference in the Netherlands in September of 2015. You can learn more about him at http://www.BillCorbett.com.

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